Fendt 9620Rx - Big hills = no go! ????

Fendt 9620Rx - Big hills = no go! ????

The image of a multiplicity of combine harvesters traversing and harvesting the corn plains of North America is a powerful testament to the success of agricultural mechanization programs. Developments in control and instrumentation have also been notable including wellestablished innovations such as grain loss meters, work rate meters and crop density meters.

Precision application of agrochemicals is an exciting and active area of research where pesticides and fertilizers are applied only where they are needed and at the appropriate concentration to elicit an optimum response. This approach requires accurate information on soil fertility and pest activity and an applicator that can automatically vary the application rate as desired.

The John Deere 9620Rx is struggling with the hills compared to the previous Case 620. The Fendt 1050 is far worse yet again from the John Deere. The wet conditions have compounded the hard pulling problems and I think I ll be looking at different tractor options after seeding. Just another day with Mike, hope you guys enjoy. Also, by no means and in no shape or form am I bashing Deere or Fendt, I don't do that nor do I approve of those who do on my channel. Both good tractors for certain purposes, and what works for me, might not for you. For real time videos and uploads, check out my Patreon Account for social media. https://www.patreon.com/bePatronu=25010547

The concept of timeliness recognizes that there is an optimum time to perform certain crop production operations from planting through to harvesting. If one or more of these operations is performed too early or too late, a timeliness penalty is likely to accrue, that is, yield and/or the quality of the crop is diminished, yielding a lower price to the farmer. For example, the ideal time to harvest grain is when the crop is ripe and the moisture is low (see also, Maintaining Working Conditions and Operation of Machinery).

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While the future role of autonomous power supply systems is likely to expand, the total contribution to agricultural mechanization energy is likely to be of modest proportion. In other words, farms of the future will depend primarily on a purchased energy supply (i.e. diesel fuel or renewable substitute/extender, and electricity) to which autonomous power may make a valuable but small contribution to those farmers who wish to pursue the available options.

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