Spudnik Sugar Beet Product Range +John Deere 7200R +John Deere 8310R +

Spudnik Sugar Beet Product Range +John Deere 7200R +John Deere 8310R +Case CVT380

As a consequence, the transition to engine powered mechanization is likely to occur sooner rather than later in the poorer regions unless rural life (especially for females) can be made more attractive.

First, they reduce the profitability of all forms of agricultural investment, including land improvements, irrigation, animals, and buildings. Second, they may cause farmers to allocate whatever investment funds are available away from mechanical inputs. This trend will be stronger the more expensive and long-lived the mechanical inputs are and the easier it is to produce other forms of capital (such as land improvements) by hand.

The mechanization of farming practices throughout the world has revolutionized food production, enabling it to maintain pace with population growth except in some lessdeveloped countries, most notably in Africa.
The importance of enhancing and upgrading such mechanization practices prior to the almost inevitable transition to engine-driven equipment is now well recognized. Automation of agricultural mechanization is an intensive area of research and development with emphasis on enhancement of food quality, preservation of operator comfort and safety, precision application of agrochemicals, energy conservation and environmental control.The mechanization of farming practices throughout the world has revolutionized food production, enabling it to maintain pace with population growth except in some lessdeveloped countries, most notably in Africa.

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There is a long history of agricultural mechanization that has been human and animal powered rather than engine powered. The difference in scale is quite staggering and is a measure of the economic gulf between the rich and the poor on this planet. For example, an average horse plowing the soil at an average rate will perform work at a rate of one horsepower (hp). In contrast, a 100 hp (75 kW) tractor could work (e.g. plowing the soil) at a rate one hundred times faster than the horse.

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